Athletics Therapy    
Recent News |  Archives |  Tags |  Newsletter |  Message Board/Forum |  About |  Links |  Subscribe to AthleticsTherapy.com RSS Feed Subscribe


More Articles
Improvements in fuel cell designImprovements in fuel cell design

Rediscovering Venus to find faraway earths

Archaeologists discover bronze remains of Iron Age chariot

Researchers resolve the Karakoram glacier anomaly, a cold case of climate science

Fish tale: New study evaluates antibiotic content in farm-raised fishFish tale: New study evaluates antibiotic content in farm-raised fish

New 3-D display technology promises greater energy efficiencyNew 3-D display technology promises greater energy efficiency

Researchers break nano barrier to engineer the first protein microfiberResearchers break nano barrier to engineer the first protein microfiber

Magnetic mirrors enable new technologies by reflecting light in uncanny ways

Structure of an iron-transport protein revealedStructure of an iron-transport protein revealed

First step: From human cells to tissue-engineered esophagusFirst step: From human cells to tissue-engineered esophagus

Lift weights, improve your memory

Spiders: Survival of the fittest group

Autophagy helps fast track stem cell activationAutophagy helps fast track stem cell activation

Myelin vital for learning new practical skillsMyelin vital for learning new practical skills

More physical activity improved school performanceMore physical activity improved school performance

Around the world in 400,000 years: The journey of the red foxAround the world in 400,000 years: The journey of the red fox

Engineering new vehicle powertrainsEngineering new vehicle powertrains

Active aging is much more than exerciseActive aging is much more than exercise

Study: New device can slow, reverse heart failureStudy: New device can slow, reverse heart failure

Are the world's religions ready for ET?Are the world's religions ready for ET?

Gut bacteria, artificial sweeteners and glucose intoleranceGut bacteria, artificial sweeteners and glucose intolerance

Recreating the stripe patterns found in animals by engineering synthetic gene networksRecreating the stripe patterns found in animals by engineering synthetic gene networks

Laying the groundwork for data-driven scienceLaying the groundwork for data-driven science

Hold on, tiger momHold on, tiger mom

Nature's designs inspire research into new light-based technologiesNature's designs inspire research into new light-based technologies

Biologists delay the aging process by 'remote control'Biologists delay the aging process by 'remote control'

Geography matters: Model predicts how local 'shocks' influence U.S. economyGeography matters: Model predicts how local 'shocks' influence U.S. economy

Identified for the first time what kind of explosive has been used after the detonationIdentified for the first time what kind of explosive has been used after the detonation

Copied from nature: Detecting software errors via genetic algorithmsCopied from nature: Detecting software errors via genetic algorithms

A new way to diagnose brain damage from concussions, strokes and dementia (12/16/2014)

Tags:
back, brain damage, brain injury, injury, medicine, muscle, stroke, traumatic brain injury
This illustration shows the function of technology that can provide real-time information of brain damage resulting from injury. -  Sergio Fantini, Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Tufts
This illustration shows the function of technology that can provide real-time information of brain damage resulting from injury. - Sergio Fantini, Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Tufts

New optical diagnostic technology developed at Tufts University School of Engineering promises new ways to identify and monitor brain damage resulting from traumatic injury, stroke or vascular dementia--in real time and without invasive procedures.

Coherent hemodynamics spectroscopy (CHS), developed and published by Tufts Professor of Biomedical Engineering Sergio Fantini, measures blood flow, blood volume, and oxygen consumption in the brain. It uses non-invasive near infrared (NIR) light technology to scan brain tissue, and then applies mathematical algorithms to interpret that information.

"CHS is based on measurements of brain hemodynamics that are interpreted according to unique algorithms that generate measures of cerebral blood flow, blood volume and oxygen consumption," says Fantini. "This technique can be used not only to assess brain diseases but also to study the blood flow and how it is regulated in the healthy brain."

Tufts has licensed CHS on a non-exclusive basis to ISS, a Champaign, Ill.-based company that specializes in technology to measure hemoglobin concentration and oxygenation in brain and muscle tissue.

"Potentially the market for CHS is large as it encompasses several applications from the monitoring of cerebrovascular disorders to assessing neurological disorders," says Beniamino Barbieri, president of ISS. "It reminds me of the introduction of ultrasound technology at beginning of the seventies; nobody back then knew how to utilize the new technology and of course, nowadays, its applications are ubiquitous in any medical center."

How It Works

CHS uses laser diodes which emit NIR light that is delivered to the scalp by fiber optics. Light waves are absorbed by the blood vessels in the brain. Remaining light is reflected back to sensors, resulting in optical signals that oscillate with time as a result of the heartbeat, respiration, or other sources of variations in the blood pressure.

By analyzing the light signals with algorithms developed for this purpose, Fantini's model is able to evaluate blood flow and the way the brain regulates it--which is one marker for brain health.

CHS technology has been tested among patients undergoing hemodialysis at Tufts Medical Center. Published research reported a lower cerebral blood flow in dialysis patients compared with healthy patients.

"Non-invasive ways to measure local changes in cerebral blood flow, particularly during periods of stress such as hemodialysis, surgeries, and in the setting of stroke, could have major implications for maintaining healthy brain function," says Daniel Weiner, M.D., a nephrologist at Tufts Medical Center (Tufts MC) and associate professor of medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine (TUSM), who is a member of the research team.

Josh Kornbluth, M.D., a neurologist at Tufts MC and associate professor of medicine at TUSM, is also working with Fantini to explore CHS's potential to assess the cerebrovascular state of patients who suffer traumatic brain injury or stroke. They hope to test CHS further among neurological critical care patients.

"Having data about local cerebral blood flow and whether it is properly regulated can allow us to more accurately develop individualized therapy and interventions instead of choosing a 'one size fits all' approach to traumatic brain injury, stroke, or subarachnoid hemorrhage," Kornbluth says.

Note: This story has been adapted from a news release issued by the Tufts University

Post Comments:

Search
New Articles
Researchers build computer models to analyze play in pro basketball and soccer

A new way to diagnose brain damage from concussions, strokes and dementiaA new way to diagnose brain damage from concussions, strokes and dementia

Light-based technology tracks oxygen levels underwater for swim performance, muscle repair

Where hockey and engineering collide: NJIT Highlanders join a pioneering concussion studyWhere hockey and engineering collide: NJIT Highlanders join a pioneering concussion study

Do concussions have lingering cognitive, physical, and emotional effects?Do concussions have lingering cognitive, physical, and emotional effects?

WHACK! Study measures head blows in girls' lacrosseWHACK! Study measures head blows in girls' lacrosse

Athletes perform better when exposed to subliminal visual cues

High school football players show brain changes after one seasonHigh school football players show brain changes after one season

Researchers identify protein that predicts post-concussion severity in professional athletes

Athletes' testosterone surges not tied to winning, study finds

The American athletics track is still a man's world

Symmetrical knees linked to Jamaican sprinting prowess

Danger of repeat head injuries: Brain's inability to tap energy source

Do spinal cord injuries cause subsequent brain damage?

Enriched environments hold promise for brain injury patients



Archives
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010


  Archives |  Submit News |  Advertise With Us |  Contact Us |  Links
Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. All contents © 2000 - 2019 AthleticsTherapy.com. All rights reserved.